Can Autism be Treated?

Therapy

This is a common and very good question that we hear “new” families ask during intake or in the very early phases of services; however, before we proceed, something needs to be clarified: treatment is not cure.  Cure implies that we know a definitive cause and we have stopped the cause. Right now, we don’t know a definitive cause of autism. Although some, professionals will claim that autism can be cured based on their studies or personal experience, it is fairly safe to say that for now, there is no cure for autism.

That last statement can be something difficult for some families to take in. From our experience in the applied setting working with families over the years, we have heard that question a handful of times and as professionals, we do feel some responsibility to, in a way, inform new parents early on duirng services so they can focus on what is doable: autism can be treated.

You have probably heard the statement “no two individuals living with autism are the same.” This statement is fairly accurate as what differentiate one person from another are the “symptoms” or difficulties that each live with.

Symptoms. Difficulties. Focusing on these then make addressing the diagnosis of autism doable.  As behavior analysts, it is our responsibility to only administer ABA-based treatment programs that have been proven to be effective given a specific difficulty.  This is called evidence based practices. The specifics of a treatment program will vary of course from one person to another, but the foundations of treatment programs are the same. A foundation derived from sound, empirically proven methods repeatedly implemented in the applied setting over time.

As parents, we will do pretty much anything for our child; however, before doing so, it is highly advised that we inform ourselves about a specific treatment before committing to such treatment especially if it will require additional resources from you (for example, money, time, and effort).

With qualified ABA professionals, proper assessments in the beginning and throughout services, goal-setting, teaching supports to maintain and generalize learned behaviors or skills, and hard work over time, measurable and quality gains can be observed.

The topic of treatment is beyond the scope of this blog; therefore, we do encourage you to communicate with a qualified behavior analyst in your area or you can check out our website at www.leafwingcenter.org for more information on this and other related topics.