Alternative Behavior Examples to Decrease Challenging Behaviors

What are alternative behavior examples? Alternative behavior examples are acceptable or positive behaviors taught to your autistic child to replace challenging behaviors.

Imagine this, your child climbs on the kitchen counter to reach for a box of cookies high in a cabinet. Can you implement a plan to decrease or eliminate the behavior of climbing on the counter? Yes, but simply stopping one behavior is not an alternative behavior example. Frequently, your child will just learn another challenging behavior to get the same result. Your child might yell or throw a tantrum because they want to eat cookies.

Let’s think of alternative behavior examples. An alternative behavior could include teaching your child to appropriately request the box of cookies. This might look like signing “food” or “cookies”, or pointing to a picture of the options in the cabinet. Or, your child may use some other mode of communication based on your child’s repertoire of skills.

Teach Alternative Behavior Solutions

Teach Alternative Behavior Solutions

Alternative behavior examples require teaching and repetition. At first, assist your child when you begin to see the signs of them seeking a snack by guiding them through the physical movements of communicating by pointing, exchanging a picture, signing, or modeling the words they should use. Gradually fade this assistance until they choose the alternative behavior on their own, without engaging in the challenging behaviors.

In practice, it is always best to teach alternative behavior examples. Caregivers can learn to ask, what is an alternative behavior for this challenge? Choosing individualized alternative behaviors that fit your child’s personality will help. Teaching alternative behavior examples can make unlearning the challenging behavior a faster process.

Types of Challenging Behavior in Children

There are four reasons why children may engage in challenging behaviors.

  • Access- to get something the child wants
  • Escape- to get out of doing something they don’t want
  • Attention- to get others to pay attention
  • Self-stimulatory/Automatic- because the behavior itself feels good or pleases them

Your child still needs to access what they want. Choose alternative behavior examples that do lead your child to obtain what they would like—access, escape, attention or self-stimulatory freedom.

Model Alternative Behavior Examples

Let’s say your child screams and throws objects when they are done with their dinner. What is your child seeking? Your child is trying to escape or get out of something—the dinner table. There are a number of alternative behavior examples you might teach your child instead of throwing and screaming.

  • Teach your child to signal that they are “all done” using whatever mode of communication is appropriate for your child.
  • Have your child pass you an acceptable object as a sign that they are finished at the table.
  • Teach your child to point at a picture that represents leaving the table.

It may be helpful for you to model the alternative behavior examples. If you point at the “all done” picture each time you are finished with your meal, your child will observe your alternative behavior example. It is important to allow your child to leave the table immediately, every time they choose the appropriate alternative behavior.
With consistency, challenging behaviors will decrease as your child learns they do get what they would like when choosing an alternative behavior example. As your child gets used to the process, acceptable behaviors become habits and the alternative behaviors become stronger over time.

Decrease Challenging Behaviors

For attention-based challenging behaviors, ask yourself what is something the child should be doing? To choose alternative behavior examples, consider your child’s repertoire of skills. Some children feel as though they are getting your attention even when being lectured or reprimanded about their choices.

When your child engages in a challenging behavior, state the problem in a sentence instead of lecturing. In addition, carve time out of your day to spend more time with your child when they are behaving appropriately.

It’s easy to assume your child should always make good choices while you get work done. Instead, schedule breaks to praise them and enjoy time with your child when they are engaged in appropriate behavior. You can spend time playing a favorite game, watching a favorite TV show or talking about school or life.

Alternative Behavior Examples to Decrease Challenging Behaviors

Manage Challenging Behaviors

When your child engages in challenging behavior because it feels good, this can require the caregiver to put more thought into choosing alternative behavior examples. Choices should include behaviors that are not harmful and tend to be controllable.

For example, your child may engage in repeating words or phrases, or vocalize sounds that are not socially appropriate. What is an alternative behavior that still allows your child freedom? You can allow your child to engage in these behaviors in a particular environment, like their bedroom.

One alternative behavior example is teaching your child to ask for “talking in my room”. This may help you both gain control over where they may engage in this behavior. When your child engages in the self-stimulatory behavior, you can work toward the child using the communication phrase and then going to the specified location. Self-stimulatory behaviors can be very difficult to address on your own, even with alternative behavior examples, especially when the behavior is self-injurious in nature.

Get Help Teaching Alternative Behavior Examples

Each time you find yourself facing a challenging behavior, take a deep breath and start to brainstorm, what are alternative behavior examples? You can make a list of alternative behavior examples to model and try. If one alternative behavior isn’t a great fit, try another alternative behavior example from your list. If you continue having difficulties addressing your child’s most challenging behaviors, it is a good idea to reach out to a trained professional as soon as possible.

Frequently asked questions about ABA therapy

What is ABA Therapy used for?

ABA-based therapy can be used in a multitude of areas. Currently, these interventions are used primarily with individuals living with ASD; however, their applications can be used with individuals living with pervasive developmental disorders as well as other disorders. For ASD, it can be used in effectively teaching specific skills that may not be in a child’s repertoire of skills to help him/her function better in their environment whether that be at home, school, or out in the community.  In conjunction with skill acquisition programs, ABA-based interventions can also be used in addressing behavioral excesses (e.g., tantrum behaviors, aggressive behaviors, self-injurious behaviors). Lastly, it can also be utilized in parent/caregiver training.

In skill acquisition programs, a child’s repertoire of skills is assessed in the beginning phase of the services in key adaptive areas such as communication/language, self-help, social skills, and motor skills as well.  Once skills to be taught are identified, a goal for each skill is developed and then addressed/taught by using ABA-based techniques to teach those important skills. Ultimately, an ABA-based therapy will facilitate a degree of maintenance (i.e., the child can still perform the learned behaviors in the absence of training/intervention over time) and generalization (i.e., the learned behaviors are observed to occur in situations different from the instructional setting).  These two concepts are very important in any ABA-based intervention.

In behavior management, the challenging behaviors are assessed for their function in the beginning phase of the services. In this phase, the “why does this behavior happen in the first place?” is determined. Once known, an ABA-based therapy will be developed to not just decrease the occurrence of the behavior being addressed, but also teach the child a functionally-equivalent behavior that is socially-appropriate.  For example, if a child resorts to tantrum behaviors when she is told she cannot have a specific item, she may be taught to accept an alternative or find an alternative for herself. Of course, we can only do this up to a certain point—the offering of alternatives.  There comes a point when a ‘no’ means ‘no’ so the tantrum behavior will be left to run its course (i.e., to continue until it ceases).  This is never easy and will take some time for parents/caregivers to get used to, but research has shown that over time and consistent application of an ABA-based behavior management program, the challenging behavior will get better.

In parent training, individuals that provide care for a child may receive customized “curriculum” that best fit their situation.  A typical area covered in parent training is teaching responsible adults pertinent ABA-based concepts to help adults understand the rationale behind interventions that are being used in their child’s ABA-based services.  Another area covered in parent training is teaching adults specific skill acquisition programs and/or behavior management programs that they will implement during family time.  Other areas covered in parent training may be data collection, how to facilitate maintenance, how to facilitate generalization of learned skills to name a few.

There is no “one format” that will fit all children and their families’ needs. The ABA professionals you’re currently working with, with your participation,  will develop an ABA-based treatment package that will best fit your child’s and your family’s needs. For more information regarding this topic, we encourage you to speak with your BCBA or reach out to us at [email protected].

Who Can Benefit From ABA Therapy?

There is a common misconception that the principles of ABA are specific to Autism. This is not the case. The principles and methods of ABA are scientifically backed and can be applied to any individual. With that said, the U.S. Surgeon General and the American Psychological Association consider ABA to be an evidence based practice. Forty years of extensive literature have documented ABA therapy as an effective and successful practice to reduce problem behavior and increase skills for individuals with intellectual disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Children, teenagers, and adults with ASD can benefit from ABA therapy. Especially when started early, ABA therapy can benefit individuals by targeting challenging behaviors, attention skills, play skills, communication, motor, social, and other skills. Individuals with other developmental challenges such as ADHD or intellectual disability can benefit from ABA therapy as well. While early intervention has been demonstrated to lead to more significant treatment outcomes, there is no specific age at which ABA therapy ceases to be helpful.

Additionally, parents and caregivers of individuals living with ASD can also benefit from the principles of ABA. Depending on the needs of your loved one, the use of specified ABA techniques in addition to 1:1 services, may help produce more desirable treatment outcomes. The term “caregiver training” is common in ABA services and refers to the individualized instruction that a BCBA or ABA Supervisor provides to parents and caregivers. This typically involves a combination of individualized ABA techniques and methods parents and caregivers can use outside of 1:1 sessions to facilitate ongoing progress in specified areas.

ABA therapy can help people living with ASD, intellectual disability, and other developmental challenges achieve their goals and live higher quality lives.

What does ABA Therapy look like?

Agencies that provide ABA-based services in the home-setting are more likely to implement ABA services similarly than doing the same exact protocols or procedures. Regardless, an ABA agency under the guidance of a Board-Certified Behavior Analyst follows the same research-based theories to guide treatment that all other acceptable ABA agencies use.

ABA-based services start with a functional behavior assessment (FBA). In a nutshell, a FBA assesses why the behaviors may be happening in the first place. From there, the FBA will also determine the best way to address the difficulties using tactics that have been proven effective over time with a focus on behavioral replacement versus simple elimination of a problem behavior. The FBA will also have recommendations for other relevant skills/behaviors to be taught and parent skills that can be taught in a parent training format to name a few. From there, the intensity of the ABA-based services is determined, again, based on the clinical needs of your child. The completed FBA is then submitted to the funding source for approval.

One-on-one sessions between a behavior technician and your child will start once services are approved. The duration per session and the frequency of these sessions per week/month will all depend on how many hours your child’s ABA services have been approved for—usually, this will be the number recommended in the FBA. The sessions are used to teach identified skills/behaviors via effective teaching procedures. Another aspect of ABA-based services in the home-setting is parent training. Parent training can take many forms depending on what goals have been established during the FBA process. The number of hours dedicated for parent training is also variable and solely depends on the clinical need for it. If a 1:1 session is between a behavior technician and your child, a parent training session or appointment is between you and the case supervisor and with and without your child present, depending on the parent goal(s) identified. Parent training service’s goal is for you to be able to have ample skills/knowledge in order for you to become more effective in addressing behavioral difficulties as they occur outside of scheduled ABA sessions. Depending on the goals established, you may be required to participate in your child’s 1:1 sessions. These participations are a good way for you to practice what you have learned from the case supervisor while at the same time, having the behavior technician available to you to give you feedback as you practice on those new skills.

As mentioned in the beginning, no two ABA agencies will do the same exact thing when it comes to providing ABA services; however, good agencies will always base their practice on the same empirically-proven procedures.

How do I start ABA Therapy?

In most cases, the first item required to start ABA therapy is the individual’s autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis report. This is typically conducted by a doctor such as a psychiatrist, psychologist, or a developmental pediatrician. Most ABA therapy agencies and insurance companies will ask for a copy of this diagnosis report during the intake process as it is required to request an ABA assessment authorization from the individual’s medical insurance provider.

The second item required to start ABA therapy is a funding source. In the United States, and in cases where Medi-Cal or Medicare insurances are involved, there is a legal requirement for ABA services to be covered when there is a medical necessity (ASD diagnosis). Medi-Cal and Medicare cover all medically necessary behavioral health treatment services for beneficiaries. This typically includes children diagnosed with ASD. Since Applied Behavior Analysis is an evidence based and effective treatment for individuals with ASD, it is considered a covered treatment when medically necessary. In many cases, private insurance will also cover ABA services when medically necessary, however in these cases, it is best to speak directly with your medical insurance provider to determine the specifics of the coverage and to ensure that ABA is in fact, a covered benefit. Additionally, some families opt to pay for ABA services out-of-pocket.

The next step to starting ABA therapy is to contact an ABA provider whom you are interested in working with. Depending on your geographic location, ABA agencies exist in many cities across the United States. Your insurance carrier, local support groups, and even a thorough online search can help you find reputable and properly credentialed ABA agencies near you. Our organization, LeafWing Center, is based in southern California and is recognized for aiding people with ASD achieve their goals with the research based on applied behavior analysis.

Once you have identified the ABA provider with whom you wish to work, they should help you facilitate the next steps. These will include facilitating paperwork and authorizations with your funding source. Once the assessment process begins, a BCBA (Board Certified Behavior Analyst) or qualified Program Supervisor should get in contact with you to arrange times in which interviews with parents/caregivers and observations of your loved one can be conducted. This will help in the process of gathering important clinical information so that with your collaboration, the most effective treatment plans and goals can be established for your loved one. This process is referred to as the Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) and is elaborated on in different blog posts on our website. With regard as to what can be expected once ABA therapy begins, please read our blog post titled: When You Start an ABA program, What Should You Reasonably Expect from Your Service Provider?

Using Graphic Organizers to Help Individuals Living with ASD in Classrooms and Other Settings

A graphic organizer is a visual support that provides visual representation of facts and concepts within the organized framework. Graphic organizers arrange key terms to show their relationship to one another, providing abstract of implicit information in a concrete, visual manner. They are particularly useful with content area material that occurs in K – 12 curricula. Graphic organizers are effective for a variety of reasons: they can be used before, during, or after students read a selection wither as an answer organizer of a measure of concept attainment. Graphic organizers also allow processing times for students as they can reflect on the written material at his or her own pace.

Additionally, abstract information is presented in a visual, concrete manner that is often more easily understood than a verbal presentation of the material alone.  One type of graphic organizer is a “thematic map.”  The focal point of the thematic map is the key word or concept enclosed in a geometric figure such as a circle or a square and if necessary, in a pictorial representation of the word or concepts. Lines and arrows connect this shape to the other shapes and words or information related to the central concepts are written on the connecting lines or in other shapes. As the map expands, the words become more specific and detailed.

The student may neither understand the concept of main idea, and/or not understand when the teacher is giving cues to students for salient information. For example, when the teacher repeats an item or changes voice tone, the information is important and typical students naturally pick this up. As with other areas, some students in the ASD spectrum do not pick up on these cues naturally and therefore need guidance. The teacher can assist the students by providing the following: (1) a complete outline that contains the main points in the lecture, (2) allowing students to follow the lecture, (3) while freeing them from any note-taking, (4) or the teacher may provide a skeletal outline that contains only the main point. Students may use this format to fill in pertinent details delivered through the direct verbal cues.  Verbal cues such as “this is the first main point” or “be sure to include…” assist the students in identifying which points are important. Subtle verbal cues also provide cues regarding importance such as “during the 1900’s…” “did you include that in your outline?” Or “make sure to remember the names.” The note-taking level of students on the spectrum then must be considered when selecting the appropriate type of assistance to be provided to the student.

Using Assignment Notebooks to Help Individuals with Autism in Classrooms and Other Settings

An effective organizational strategy for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder, especially those who are older and possess the prerequisite reading, writing, and organizational skills is an assignment notebook. All academic tasks and their due dates are listed in the notebook and the student will take it to school and home every school day. The most effective support would include a sample of how each assignment should look. Ideally, it should also contain examples of completed items (math equations, definitions, filled out problems, etc.) as these would function as visual examples of the correctly completed assignment. Although, simplified assignment books are certainly acceptable and can be effective depending on the particular student. The classroom teacher would need to check the notebook at school to make certain all information and expectations are included. At home, the parents or caregivers monitor the notebook to make sure the student has successfully completed all necessary assignments or activities to the level expected of them. A signature section for each day can provide an additional layer of thoroughness. This can include a signature section for the parent who monitors the assignment book and/or the student who completes the assignments. Essentially, these assignment books function as a visual checklist to help students stay organized and on-task. These are pretty standard in schools, yet it is imperative they are used to help students with ASD succeed.

As with most strategies for students on the spectrum, the specific skills required to effectively use an assignment book will need to be taught or should already be in the student’s repertoire. In addition, motivation needs to be taken into consideration. The teacher or support staff may need to provide additional reinforcement when the naturally occurring contingencies (i.e., assignment completion) are not sufficient. For example, if a student completes all daily assignments within a specified time frame, let’s say, homework that was assigned Monday through Thursday, then on Friday, they may receive access to a special activity or item. Another way to help students “buy-in” to the idea of assignment books is to individualize assignment books so that they include items, characters, colors, or designs that are preferable to the student. Students can customize their assignment books to increase the book’s value and help boost motivation.

We hope that you find the use of assignment books as a helpful organizational tool to promote homework and academic task completion!

Using Time Warnings To Help Students With Autism

Now is the time? Kid and clock: preschool child preparing for the school

Giving students warnings about time remaining in an activity can provide a helpful frame of reference. Time limit warnings should be paired with an auditory or visual cue, such as a bell or card. Towards the end of the work activity, the teacher should verbalize, ‘five minutes left, ‘two minutes left’. For students requiring additional support, the verbal que can be paired with the gestural pointing to the timer and manually signing ‘finished’ using sign language. When preparing students for the end of an activity that has a natural ending point, such as a game or a timed-test, the teacher should alert students that a transition is approaching by making such a statement as, ‘only a few more cards and the game is over’. Finally, time warnings or making transitional cards as part of the student’s routine can also help students with autism develop the capacity to be flexible for change. Additionally, teaching students to put away materials in the completion of an activity can function as a natural queue that one activity is ending, and that another is beginning. For example, the teacher can say, ‘once you finish that problem, you can begin to get ready for recess. All of these simple, yet very effective support strategies are easy to use, and help both students and teachers during everyday classroom activities.

Using Activity Completion Signals to Support Students with Autism in Classroom Settings

An activity completion signal is a tool which can help students identify when an activity is over. Many students with autism have difficulty knowing how long an activity or task will last. These difficulties may also be present when students are asked to switch their focus to another task. Activity completion signals such as “Finish Pockets” or a “Finish Boxes” provide a lot of support for students transitioning between activities. Finish pockets, like other tools, can easily be created—folders or plastic containers can be labeled and placed near students’ visual schedules for students to place completed work into. When the student completes an activity, he or she should remove the icon of the current task or activity, and then also place it in the finish pocket. During this time, the teacher would indicate that the activity is over. For example, “math is over everyone, time for recess” thereby allowing a student to recognize a transition, and recognize what comes next in a visual format rather than only hearing the instructions.

There are various ways you can use activity completion signals such as turning an icon-card around so that it is facing backwards, placing an icon or object near the finish box, crossing off the name of the activity or task on a white board, and of course, the old tried and true timer to indicate the end of a task. The more creative you can be, the more variation you will have, but again, just like with visual schedules, the student’s learning rates and skill levels need to be considered when determining the type of signal you use.

In addition, it is always true that you will need to teach the student with autism how to respond to the signals and that you will need to reward (reinforce) the student’s correct responses to the signals.

Using Mini Schedules and Task Organizers to Help Students with ASD In Classroom Settings

There are many types of visual schedules that can complement children’s daily tasks and activities by providing more specific cues about those tasks and activities. Mini schedules are used to provide specific information about the task at hand. These mini schedules can be highly individualized based on the individual’s skill level to meet the requirements of a given task. For example, if a student needs support on steps necessary to complete a math task, a mini schedule would be used to help identify step-by-step instructions of the task.

A mini schedule can also be designed to provide opportunities for choice making. For example, a mini schedule for an art lesson would direct a student to the stages required for drawing and coloring an object. At specific points along the mini schedule, the student would be required to make a choice between two or more items to create the art project. In this application, the mini schedule provides both the structure and the opportunity for decision-making.

Another visual schedule – the task organizer, can be used to add more structure to a lesson or activity depicted on the mini schedule. Task organizers provide a task analysis, or breakdown, of the steps required to complete activities. In the case of a math lesson, a task organizer could be used to further describe the steps within a specific activity, such as writing odd or even numbers.

Mini schedules and task organizers should only be used when a student needs extra structure for understanding activities, or to provide opportunities for decision-making to help a student perform at the most appropriate, independent level. For example, some students require minimal external structure and would need only a daily schedule to keep on task. However, those students who need more assistance to complete a task on their daily schedule would benefit from a series of mini schedules for each major activity.

Remember that a mini schedule or task organizer is usually not enough to help the student be successful. Most often, each of the steps in the mini schedule would need to be taught by repeatedly prompting and correcting attempts by the student. Last, remember that you will need to reinforce (reward) the student’s correct performance of the steps in the mini schedule or task organizer.

Some Considerations and Strategies for Students with Autism in Classroom Settings

When creating an educational program for students with ASD, each student’s unique characteristics present unique challenges for administrators and school support staff. An effective classroom must include a physical structure that enhances learning opportunities and instructional approaches that facilitate learning, language acquisition, behavior management, social skills, and academic goals. We can apply many of the basic principles of effective instruction that are used in within the general education classroom as we work with students with autism and Asperger Syndrome, however, there are certain strategies that have been proven to be particularly effective. These strategies provide structure and predictability to the learning process, allow students to anticipate task requirements and setting expectations, and teach a variety of skills across content areas in the natural environment, enhancing the likelihood of generalization.

Predictability and sameness are significant factors throughout student’s daily lives. One way to address these elements in the classroom is with “Environmental Supports”. Environmental supports help students organize the physical space in ways that help our students predict any changes in their daily routines or deviations from typical expectations that may take place during the school day; different activities or events, a substitute teacher, or fire drills. We can help students understand expectations, and in general, make sense of their entire environment. Researchers have defined environmental support as “aspects of the environment, other than interactions with people, which affect the learning that takes place”. Examples of environmental supports are: Labels, Boundary settings, Visual schedules, Behavioral-based education tools, Activity completion signals, Choice boards, and Waiting supports.

All of these environmental support strategies are a simple yet effective way to help a student respond appropriately in their day-to-day activities throughout their school day. Environmental supports can be effectively utilized across all environments and all settings to help support individual with ASD. Additionally, environment supports have been shown to increase student independence, and help stimulate language.

The physical organization of the classroom can be a crucial element for them enhancing success. Structure and predictability facilitate the students understanding of the environment, which can help decrease worry or agitation the student might have. This is really important for students with autism who tend to react negatively or really that difficult time with changes and unsent uncertainty in their environment. Something as simple as labeling furniture and objects in a classroom can have numerous benefits for students with autism; label boxes or containers with visual representations such as icons or hand-written labels. Students can then be taught to match the label on the container to the label on the shelf, allowing independents in retrieving or returning an activity to its appropriate place in the classroom.

Again, we want to emphasize that each student is unique and the strategies used need to reflect their unique needs.

How to teach your child to wait and what you could do before and after telling your child “no”

Two common difficulties that we encounter when working with families over the years are regarding waiting and when a child is told no.  These two scenarios can be overwhelming as they are often accompanied by the most intense challenging behaviors.  We will go over these on this this post.

First off, the skill of requesting appropriately must be well-established already.  If this skill is not yet in your child’s repertoire then it must be taught first. If the skill is already there, but it’s not as fluent as we’d need it to be, then work on that first.

Let’s say your child can already ask for a cookie—this is great, but what can you do if for some reason, you child has to be told to wait?   If your first thought given that question you just read is along the lines of “oh…” then do consider the following.  There is this passage of time that happens between being asked to wait for something and finally getting that something.  The key here is working on that gap.  Depending on how your child “understands” that concept—time—you may have to be more hands-on when helping out your child go through it.   Instead of simply saying “wait,”  try giving your child something that he likes to “kill time.” This is not something out of the ordinary. Case in point: look at long lines of people at a grocery store, a theme park ride, at a bank, et cetera.  It is very rare to see a long line of people, waiting, just starting blankly at the back of the head of the person in front of them (unless you’re in the military or something similar) and just “wait” for their turn.  Perhaps you’ll notice a handful dealing with waiting in not-so-positive ways but for the most part, people will do something to pass time.  From being on their phones, talking to someone whom they are with, looking around, reading a book—we, again, most of us, can handle waiting because we fill that gap with something else.  And that is something that you can try out—offer your child something that they will not mind doing while they wait.  The more reinforcing that activity the better. When starting to teach your child to wait while engaged in something, make sure to keep the wait-time very short. How short?  It depends on each child really, but a good rule of thumb is to end the wait when your child is still behaving well (i.e., before your child starts that path to a full-blown tantrum). Let’s say that time is around one minute—great. Keep it around that time limit and systematically increase the time just a bit and stay on that higher limit (e.g., from one minute to about two minutes) until your child gets used to it.  From there, you can once again increase the limit to say three minutes.  This does not happen without any difficulty—the key here is you being consistent.  Also, avoid a situation wherein the wait time had been too long that your child “forgets” about whatever it is he or she is waiting for.  You need your child’s motivation for whatever it is he or she is waiting for for the learning process to “click.”  Once that motivation goes away, the teachable opportunity is lost so it is best to be realistic on how long you really want your child to wait.

Again, teach waiting only if they can truly have that cookie, but at a later time (or after a number of activities).  If they cannot have that cookie, then don’t say wait (after which they do) then tell them no in the end. Hence, the next topic: what can you do when you are about to tell your child no (i.e., denial).

True: a no is a no and that is something our children must learn; however, before we get to that lesson, let’s take a few steps back.  If you know that your child cannot have that cookie, give your child’s behaviors a chance to not escalate.  Offer your child something she likes instead of whatever that is she wants at the moment.  The key here is you offering an alternative that she truly wants—whatever that is given that moment.  If your child accepts the alternative—great!  If your child does not like your attempts to compromise—and if your child is capable—ask her to choose her own alternative item/food/activity.  Be prepared to honor her choice.  If your child accepts that scenario—great!   If not, time to roll up your sleeves—it’s time to teach your child that no means no.  There is no going around this.  You have offered her alternatives. You have also given her a chance to choose her own alternative.  If those fail, you have done your job but despite your efforts to teach alternatives, the tantrums will happen. As those behaviors are happening, the worst thing that you can do is give in—no.  Don’t give in as that will only reinforce all those not-so-nice behaviors.  It will be difficult, but a no is a no.

When your child’s behaviors start to de-escalate, it is still possible to offer her alternative and/or giving her a chance to select her own, but never give in.

If your child already engages in the most extreme challenging behaviors such as self-injurious behaviors or property destruction or any other behaviors that compromise the safety of others during times when he or she is denied access to something, we highly recommend that you immediately seek assistance from a trained professional.

Using Social Stories to Help Individuals with Autism in Classrooms and Other Settings

Using Social Stories is a strategy that is likely not new to teachers. However, not all teachers know that they can be used to work with and teach individuals with autism specific skills surrounding social and behavioral needs. Social stories interventions enhance social skill acquisition for many students with autism. They help individuals with autism to better understand the tones of interpersonal communication so that they can interact in an effective and appropriate manner.

Let’s take a look at social stories are and how can they be used with students with autism?

A social story is a mini book that describes a social situation and the appropriate social responses. Social stories are individualized for each student and teach a specific desired response. They are used to seek answers to questions that an individual with autism may need to know to interact with others, for example, answers to who, what, when, where and why in social situations.  Social stories can also be used to learn new routines, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger and frustration.

Social stories are written using four sentence types. Descriptive sentences, which provide information about the subject, setting, and action; directive sentences, which describe the appropriate behavioral responses; perspective sentences, which identify the possible feelings and reactions of others; and control sentences, which describe the actions and responses of the story participants. A sample control sentence might be, a puppy barks to get its owner’s attention. Or, Ginny yelled to get the teacher’s attention. It is customary for social stories to have two to five descriptive, perspective, or control sentences in the story. Writing social stories for lower functioning students or students who have the tendency to over focus on a specific part of the story may require dropping the control sentence.

When creating a social story there are 10 steps that are used: One, identify the target behavior in the problematic situation. Two, define the target behavior. Three, collect baseline data on the target behavior. Four, write a social story using the four-sentence types. Five, present one to three sentences on each page. Six, use photographs and drawings or icons. Seven, read the social story to the student and model the desired behavior for them. Eight, collect data on the target behavior. Nine, review the data and the social story procedures and modify if they are not effective. Ten, plan for maintenance and generalization.

Social stories are written in the first-person point of view or the child’s point of view. It should also be in the present tense and the child’s level of vocabulary and comprehension should be considered.

Remember that students with autism frequently do not maintain or generalize skills that they have learned. Although you will ultimately fade the use of a social story, plan activities to assist the student in generalizing skills across content, persons, environment, and situation. Remember to transition the newly acquired skill to the naturally occurring contingencies. Social stories appear to be a promising intervention method for improving the social behavior of individuals with autism.

Motivational words

How Choice Boards and “Wait Supports” Can Be Used to Support Students with Autism in Classrooms

A “Choice Board” is a type of visual environmental support that can be beneficial for students, especially students with ASD. Choices should be incorporated into as many activities as possible as choice boards provide students with decision-making opportunities. As such, it can display the objects, pictures, icons, or words that would represent a menu of activities or reinforcers. These can easily be made with supplies such as poster paper, card stock, white boards, or on any surface that you can attach or write on. Choice boards are often placed next to a student’s daily schedule, and when a designated time arrives, students simply select a preferred activity from the board. Choice boards with preferred activities can be placed near the free time or break time area of the room, and provide a stimulus for independent selection of an activity.

Similar to choice boards, ‘Waiting Supports’ are another visual strategy, or tool that can be incorporated throughout the school day. As we know, waiting is a difficult skill for many children, with or without disabilities. But for students with autism in particular, waiting typically presents problems because they have limited ability to delay gratification and comprehend the concept of waiting. We also know that if a student is waiting too long or is not engaged in some type of activity, even if it is a simple activity such as putting a back pack away or clearing a desk, then more than likely, unwanted behaviors will occur. Therefore, students with ASD will typically require specific instructions to develop appropriate waiting behaviors. When developing waiting supports, we need to determine if the student has the prerequisite skills that are necessary to engage in waiting behaviors. This is easy to do. First, role-play and practice waiting using different instructions and in different settings when you want to identify this skill. Keep in mind that when you are practicing ‘learning to wait’ with your students, make sure it is authentic and in an actual setting where you would expect the student to use this skill. Again, be sure to teach waiting skills across a variety of settings to increase the likelihood of generalization. Even using a peer model or a peer buddy during waiting times can offer support for desired behaviors, and specific ‘physical supports’ such as chairs near the waiting area, setting a timer, or holding a picture representing “wait” can also help a student learn this concept.

As we know, for any kind of learning to take place, it is essential for students to have active involvement with their teachers, peers, and the curriculum. Students with autism tend to be passive learners. Therefore, it is necessary to plan activities that require students to become active participants. Creating opportunities for students to respond is a high instructional priority. Research supports a functional relationship between academic performance and how often a student is able to respond. Therefore, the more a student participates in an activity, the more off task and disruptive behaviors will decrease.