Using Mini Schedules and Task Organizers to Help Students with ASD In Classroom Settings

There are many types of visual schedules that can complement children’s daily tasks and activities by providing more specific cues about those tasks and activities. Mini schedules are used to provide specific information about the task at hand. These mini schedules can be highly individualized based on the individual’s skill level to meet the requirements of a given task. For example, if a student needs support on steps necessary to complete a math task, a mini schedule would be used to help identify step-by-step instructions of the task.

A mini schedule can also be designed to provide opportunities for choice making. For example, a mini schedule for an art lesson would direct a student to the stages required for drawing and coloring an object. At specific points along the mini schedule, the student would be required to make a choice between two or more items to create the art project. In this application, the mini schedule provides both the structure and the opportunity for decision-making.

Another visual schedule – the task organizer, can be used to add more structure to a lesson or activity depicted on the mini schedule. Task organizers provide a task analysis, or breakdown, of the steps required to complete activities. In the case of a math lesson, a task organizer could be used to further describe the steps within a specific activity, such as writing odd or even numbers.

Mini schedules and task organizers should only be used when a student needs extra structure for understanding activities, or to provide opportunities for decision-making to help a student perform at the most appropriate, independent level. For example, some students require minimal external structure and would need only a daily schedule to keep on task. However, those students who need more assistance to complete a task on their daily schedule would benefit from a series of mini schedules for each major activity.

Remember that a mini schedule or task organizer is usually not enough to help the student be successful. Most often, each of the steps in the mini schedule would need to be taught by repeatedly prompting and correcting attempts by the student. Last, remember that you will need to reinforce (reward) the student’s correct performance of the steps in the mini schedule or task organizer.