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Can Autism Spectrum Disorders Get Worse?

A better way to rephrase this is “can the symptoms that define an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis get worse?” Rephrasing the question this way makes us focus more on the specific difficulties that we can develop sound treatment for. Can ASD get worse? The answer is yes, but it also can get better.

For families that are just now starting their ABA-based services at home and/or in a school setting, it is crucial to identify what these symptoms or difficulties are exactly. Upon identifying, assessing, planning and implementing proper treatment programs, these symptoms can be either directly or indirectly addressed by the ABA services. With proper guidance of a BCBA, a sound comprehensive treatment plan may facilitate gains over a targeted amount of time.

That is not to say that once goals are met, “autism is cured.” No. What it means is that the ABA services that addressed the initial or more recent difficulties have been effective as the goals for that period of services have been met. How long that period of services is varies from one child to another. Some children may just need six to 12 months of ABA-based services while some children may need the services for a more extended period of time. Be the services for a short or an extended period of time, a crucial aspect of the services is to guarantee that parents/caregivers are given proper training in order for the family to maintain and continue to generalize their child’s learned skills from the services in the absence of the ABA team. Equally important are the parents’/caregiver’s ability to generalize their own skills when presented with similar situations that their child may face in the near future and again, in the absence of an ABA team.

As with any symptom, left untreated it will get worse. It is important then for families who have not yet received any prior ABA-based services to seek the services in order to get difficulties under some control. Families that previously received ABA-based services who find themselves unable to effectively address their now older child to seek once again ABA services in order for them to address their child’s more current needs.