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How To Make Long Car Rides More Manageable With Children With Autism.

Taking a long car ride anytime soon?  It’s time to start planning how to keep your child busy and how to make the long drive as enjoyable as it can be.  Some children with autism may do really well on car rides as it provides them with time for them to do enjoyable things such as looking out the window and watching the trees and other cars go by.  Some may enjoy listening to the music in the car, or even sleeping throughout the trip!  Other children may not do so well and parents may run into troubles such as crying, screaming, kicking seats, and even trying to get out of seat belts.  Regardless of how easy or how difficult your car rides are, some of the below strategies may assist with make the ride a bit more enjoyable.

First, plan out the mileage of the trip and divide that mileage up into small chunks.  If you are driving 300 miles, break this up into 10 chunks of 30 miles (or even 20 chunks of 5 miles, depending on how often your child may need positive rewards for good behavior).  Every 30 miles that your child behaves well (define this for your child such as sitting nicely, no screaming, and no kicking) he is allowed to pull a prize out of a prize bag that you have prepared ahead of time with treats, small toys, and special items that your child will enjoy.  Draw out squares on a piece of paper so he knows how many squares are left until you arrive at your destination.  Possibly make the half way point a very large prize, if he earns it.

Second, prepare a snack bag as well as a toy bag ahead of time so you have food when your child is hungry and toys when your child is bored.  Toys such as drawing boards, electronics ( iPad or similar device) on which the child can play games or watch movies, travel games such as perfection, and books may work well to keep your child occupied.    

The theme is to plan ahead so you and your family can be prepared for the long trek ahead.  Have fun!

junel Tags: , , , , , , , ,

“I’ll be honest, it takes some time to adjust…but once you see it works and you start seeing your child respond, it makes it all worthwhile.”

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